wpkg --purge | -P

Short Hand

wpkg -P

Options Comments
--admindir Define the administration directory, where the database of the installed packages resides.
--debug Define a set of flags of things to print out for debug purposes.
--dry-run Run all validations then exit.
--force-all Ignore all problems that can be bypassed.
--force-depends Accept installing packages with missing dependencies.
--force-hold Remove package even if marked as being on hold.
--force-remove-essential Allow wpkg to delete essential packages
--instdir Define the installation directory, where the data files are installed on the target.
--no-act Run all validations then exit.
--no-force-all Prevent any --force-... command line option from being used.
--no-force-depends Prevent packages with missing dependencies from being installed.
--no-force-hold Prevent packages that are on hold from being removed.
--no-force-remove-essential Prevent the removal of essential packages, this is the default.
--quiet Request for minimal output. For the --verify function this is the default behavior.
--recursive Recursively scan the --repository directories or remove all dependencies automatically.
--refuse-all Prevent all problems from ever being bypassed.
--refuse-depends Prevent packages with missing dependencies from being installed.
--refuse-hold Prevent packages that are on hold from being removed.
--refuse-remove-essential Prevent the removal of essential packages, this is the default.
--root Define the installation root path.
--simulate Run all validations then exit.
--tracking-journal Specify the filename of the journal where commands that can be used to rollback the system are saved.
--verbose Display log information of level INFO.

 

The --purge command is used to deconfigure and remove a package from a target system. Note that even after a purge, wpkg has knowledge that the package had been installed as its database is not cleared. (This is not like dpkg that also deletes the corresponding entries in its database.)

The same validations apply as for the --remove command.

The --purge command only accept names of unpacked and installed packages. It also runs the removal and deconfiguration scripts. Note that by default packages that are marked as being on Hold do not get purged unless you specified the --force-hold option. See the --set-selection command for more information about the current selection of a package.

Note that our version of purge deletes only well defined configuration files. This means only the following configuration files are deleted:

  • <config-filename>
  • <config-filename>.wpkg-new
  • <config-filename>.wpkg-old
  • <config-filename>.wpkg-user

Other possible backup files are not touched by wpkg. For example, if you make a copy named <config-filename>.cya then it will remain on your system even after a purge1. Note that wpkg supports global scripts called hooks that can be used to delete additional configuration files if you feel like it is really necessary.

It is possible to use the --purge command with the --autoremove command to remove packages that were implicitly (autmoatically) installed to satisfy a dependency and did not have their selection changed by --set-selection. This is a very special case since normally two commands cannot be used simultaneously on the same command line.

 
  • 1. dpkg recognizes a pletoria of suffixes and prefixes commonly used for backups and it deletes all of those files. For example, ~<config-filename> and <config-filename>.bak would be deleted.
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